Published on: 22/07/2016

News - Cycle of Violence

The Cycle of Violence

Many women in the Democratic Republic of Congo have lost so much because of war and rebel activity across the country.  It is a terrifying truth that 48 women are raped every hour in the DRC because of the rebel forces pillaging villages and towns, taking the women and children, often killing many men. Many women become ill because of the brutality, they lose their livelihoods, their husbands leave them because of shame and they are left with nothing.

Three brave women from Kirotshe, near Goma have shared their stories.  Steriya Deo, Maria Nzabanita and Brigette Uzamukunda have been through many horrific things. It is a reminder that we, as the church, must recognise the importance to pray for the cycle of violence to be broken.

News - Cycle of Violence 2

Steriya Deo

In 2013 I was five months pregnant and was in my home in Minova.
There were many shooting guns so I hid in my house, but six soldiers forced their way in. They raped me and miscarried two days later. I went to the hospital but the doctors had no answers because my uterus had come out.

I still suffer with continuous pain from this. When my husband found out what had happened to me, he left and abandoned our three remaining children and me.

Four of my children have died – two have died from illness and two were shot.

News - Cycle of Violence 3

Maria Nzabanita

In 2002 there was trouble between soldiers so we fled to a village near Masisi.

When we reached Rubayi there were so many shooting guns that all of us scattered. I managed to stay with another woman but soldiers found us, took us to separate places and raped us. We went to a health centre and were given medicine. I decided to stay in that area and spent a month in Masisi. I had to flee when the fighting came here. Unfortunately, my husband was shot with the others.

News - Cycle of Violence 4

Brigette Uzamukunda

In 2014, there was fighting in Ngumba so I ran to the mountains with my mother. Soldiers saw us and took us. Three of them raped me. I was thirteen. The morning after, my mother found me injured and brought me home. Since my father had died when I was six, my mother had no means to feed me and I had no access to school. I live with no help. I had two brothers who died in the war and I am the only one left.

  elimmissions.co.uk/latest

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